Washington Print Club

Washington Print Club The Washington Print Club, which celebrates its 50th birthday in 2014, is a membership organization open to everyone interested in the arts!

Established in 1964, the WPC is a place where enthusiasts can share and stimulate their interest in prints and works of art on paper. Members come from a diverse set of backgrounds and include artists, collectors, curators, gallery owners, art educators, paper conservators, and students. Throughout its existence the WPC has been guided by a distinguished group of advisors, drawn from the Washington-Baltimore area art community, who have helped enrich and facilitate its programs for half a century. Join us today!

Today begins our social media “takeover” by staff from the National Gallery of Art’s department of prints and drawings. ...
05/16/2020

Today begins our social media “takeover” by staff from the National Gallery of Art’s department of prints and drawings. Our thanks go to Shelley Langdale, Curator and Head of Modern Prints and Drawings, for organizing this wonderful opportunity to see NGA staff favorites.

First up is Francisco de Goya
“Buen Viage (Bon Voyage),” Plate 64 from the series Los Caprichos,1799 Etching, burnished aquatint, and engraving on laid paper. Selected by Rena Hoisington, Curator and Head of Modern Prints and Drawings.

Rena adds, “Francisco de Goya’s unsettling image, with its sardonic title, shows a group of monstrous witches being transported high above the earth on the back of a winged creature--a midnight ride eerily illuminated by moonlight.”

Georgetown university curator LuLen Walker has chosen for us “St Jerome in the Desert,” Cornelis Cory, engraving, 1565. ...
05/14/2020

Georgetown university curator LuLen Walker has chosen for us “St Jerome in the Desert,” Cornelis Cory, engraving, 1565.

About this work, LuLen says, “This Old Master engraving showing St. Jerome in contemplative study, isolating in the desert, seems oddly relevant in these times of social distancing. Cornelis Cort, the Netherlandish engraver, was living in Titian’s home in Venice where he was engaged in creating engraved copies of the Master’s paintings. Although Titian’s prototype is no longer extant there are versions of his Penitent St. Jerome in the Louvre, the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, and the Brera in Milan. To me, the beauty of Cort’s engraving lies in the details that represent the saint’s ascetic existence, including the skull, the hourglass, and the books. Jerome’s symbol, the lion, is shown full-length wearing a faint smile. Upon close scrutiny one wonders if Cort or Titian had ever seen a lion in person. Perched above the majestic beast is a tiny bird, perhaps a symbol of peace. Beside the plinth upon which Jerome is seated, a stream of water issues forth from a spout, suggestive of a divine presence sustaining the scholar saint during his two years of self-imposed solitude as a hermit.”

Georgetown University curator of special collections shares a new acquisition: John Platt, “The Giant Stride” woodcut, 1...
05/12/2020

Georgetown University curator of special collections shares a new acquisition: John Platt, “The Giant Stride” woodcut, 1918.

LuLen wrote: “A couple of years after mounting a 2017 exhibition on color woodcuts, I was thrilled to find a rare impression of John Platt’s seminal print, The Giant Stride, at the Capital Art Fair in Rosslyn. I love this image because of the way the children are suspended in mid-air in various expressions of euphoric animation. It’s also a tour de force print in the Japanese woodblock tradition, and was awarded a Gold Medal for best print in any medium at the 3rd annual International Exposition in Los Angeles in 1922.”

Our guest curator today is artist/printmaker Susan Goldman. Susan has selected three works by Andy Warhol from the colle...
05/07/2020

Our guest curator today is artist/printmaker Susan Goldman. Susan has selected three works by Andy Warhol from the collection of the National Gallery of Art: “Mao” screenprint, 1972, Styria Studio, printer; “Green Marilyn” acrylic and silkscreen, 1962; “Muhammed Ali” screenprint, 1978, Rupert Jansen Smith, printer.

Susan has this to say about the works: “When I was studying printmaking in the late 70’s as an undergraduate BFA, and in the early 80’s as a graduate MFA, screenprint was always considered the bastard of printmaking. Screenprint was considered commercial and indelicate —- until Andy Warhol came along and blew apart ivory tower attitudes and tradition. Screenprint became a legitimate “fine art” method.
What is so spectacular about these prints are their scale, the application of the ink, printing through a wide mesh screen with heavy housepaint, and printing atop and under, photographic screenprint films. The interplay of form expressed via the power of an icon, through Warhol’s seductive use of broad gesture and swaths of color. The surfaces of these prints are luscious, dimensional, painterly. Warhol’s 20th century portraits are wild. The cult of celebrity meets 20th century commercial advertising and fine arts. Printmaking now competes with painting. I believe Warhol’s hybrid of printmaking influences artistic practices today, again demonstrating how printmaking is the intersection of all art form.”

Guest curator artist Frederik Langhendries has chosen a work from the Kreeger Museum: James Ensor’s “The Pisser (Le piss...
05/05/2020

Guest curator artist Frederik Langhendries has chosen a work from the Kreeger Museum: James Ensor’s “The Pisser (Le pisseur) or A Man of the People (Un homme du peuple),” etching, 1887.

About his choice, Frederik shared: ”Experts have related Le Pisseur by Ensor to a drawing by Jacques Callot (Uffizi, Florence) of a similar subject. In Ensor’s etching, a top-hatted gentleman relieves himself on a graffiti-covered wall with the inscription Ensor est un fou (Ensor is a mad man). Le Pisseur has been understood as Ensor’s irreverent response to the art critics. During the late 19th century, much of Ensor’s innovating paintings were rejected as scandalous criticism on politics, religion and society. Ensor created 86 etchings between 1886 and 1891, the height of his printmaking period.

Belgium is a good place to find several urine-focused objects. One of the main tourist attractions in Brussels is a famous 2 feet high statue of a urinating boy called Manneken Pis. The current bronze statue was made in 1619. It replaces an earlier one dating from 1388. Images of urinating young boys, what art historians call the putto (young angels) first appeared in the margins of illuminated manuscripts in the 1200s. In the same trend, the Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn made 2 famous etchings, Pissing Man and Pissing Woman, in 1631.”

Gemini G.E.L.
05/04/2020

Gemini G.E.L.

“Art is a powerful source of fact and joy.”
—Robert Rauschenberg, 1991

Looking to art to help lift our spirits in these challenging times, we’ve been diving into the Gemini G.E.L. archives to bring you an in-depth look at some of the artists who have worked with us over the past 54 years. Each week we will be sharing insight into the collaborative process at Gemini. Our first #ArtistoftheWeek is Robert Rauschenberg. Follow the link in our bio to view limited works available by the artist.
——————
Robert Rauschenberg working at Gemini G.E.L. in 1998. Photograph © 1998 Sidney B. Felsen
—————
#geminigel #robertrauschenberg

The Greater Reston Arts Center (GRACE) is featuring an online exhibition of artists’ books.https://restonarts.org/exhibi...
05/02/2020
The Velocity of a Page – Greater Reston Arts Center

The Greater Reston Arts Center (GRACE) is featuring an online exhibition of artists’ books.

https://restonarts.org/exhibition/the-velocity-of-a-page/

ONLINE EXHIBITION The Velocity of a Page is a cross section of contemporary practices in book arts and publishing. The book as an object, as a practice, and as a place wields a specific gravity. The books and publications on display are experiments in art-making. They are tools to build and support....

International Print Center New York
04/29/2020

International Print Center New York

Have you ever checked out our Map of the Print World? This map is a directory of print-centered institutions around the world.

You can browse our catalog of printshops, print-focused galleries and museums, university programs, and libraries & archives at ipcny.org/map.

Are you an institution or studio in the print community? Email us at [email protected] to be added to the map!

#ipcny #artmap #printworld #IPCNYfromHome

Papermaking by hand at Hayle Mill, England in 1976
04/29/2020
Papermaking by hand at Hayle Mill, England in 1976

Papermaking by hand at Hayle Mill, England in 1976

A short film, made by Anglia TV, describing all the processes in making fine paper including a section devoted to making and fitting a watermark to a mould. ...

Artist, art professor, and guest curator Damon Arhos has chosen an Andy Warhol color screenprint on paper from the colle...
04/29/2020

Artist, art professor, and guest curator Damon Arhos has chosen an Andy Warhol color screenprint on paper from the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum: “Flowers” (1970), a gift of the Woodward Foundation. About this work, Damon says: “When this series was produced, it was interpreted as a departure from Warhol’s practice of exhibiting commercial and cultural imagery — one especially poignant as it immediately followed the censorship of the “13 Most Wanted Men” mug shots. Yet, given its nod to iconic subject matter, patterned fashion designs, and mechanical production processes, the series exemplifies the artist’s true form. I always have admired the way Warhol twisted authenticity, giving us a reason to stop and observe what we see every day. Seeing Warhol’s hibiscus blossoms again, I paused to look away from my computer and instead gazed outside the window at the azaleas in my backyard.”

Adult Virtual Workshops - Minnesota Center for Book Arts
04/28/2020
Adult Virtual Workshops - Minnesota Center for Book Arts

Adult Virtual Workshops - Minnesota Center for Book Arts

In an effort to support social distancing and to continue to spark the artistic impulse in all of us, MCBA is offering live, virtual workshops on a variety of topics, suitable for all skill levels. While we’re away from the studios, let’s print in the kitchen, fold paper on coffee tables, and de...

Independent curator, art history professor, and prolific lecturer Aneta Georgievska-Shine has selected for us Rembrandt’...
04/27/2020

Independent curator, art history professor, and prolific lecturer Aneta Georgievska-Shine has selected for us Rembrandt’s “Christ Crucified between the Two Thieves (The Three Crosses)” 1653, drypoint and engraving, from the collection of the National Gallery of Art.

Aneta says, “The Three Crosses (ca. 1650-1653) is one of Rembrandt’s most complex visual narratives in the medium of print. We have been brought to the hill of the skull to witness the Crucifixion. But who of the two figures flanking Christ is the good, and who is the bad thief? Who are those diverse people in the mob assembled for this spectacle? And which moment of the Crucifixion are we beholding? Rembrandt’s tendency to suggest so many different possibilities is especially pronounced here, as this “multiple” shifts from state to state, impression to impression, resulting in nearly one-of-a-kind images. Each state is like a different view of that eternal event, a different temporal sequence within the longest day. And as we follow the artist’s cinematic gesture, we are reminded of the opening lines of Burnt Norton, where T. S. Eliot observes that time present and time past are both contained in time future, time future contained in time past, and that all time is “unredeemable.”

Guest curator artist Carol Barsha has chosen three works by Philip Guston, “Summer” 1980; “Coat” (1980); and “Room” (198...
04/24/2020

Guest curator artist Carol Barsha has chosen three works by Philip Guston, “Summer” 1980; “Coat” (1980); and “Room” (1980). All three are lithographs printed at Gemini G.E.L. All are in the National Gallery of Art Collection.

Carol said, “I studied with Philip Guston in graduate school and he is ever present in my mind. He was an extraordinary teacher because he never talked about style or technique only what was honest and "earned" in one’s work.

These lithographs were all done in the last year of his life and have all the power and bravery his late work possessed. I love the way Guston's uses the lithographic crayon to make his quirky, yet sensitive lines and how the rich, oily blacks of the crayon make the forms come alive with volume and weight. The subject matter in these three works all contain a combination of irony, tragedy, and empathy for the human condition. These images were personal for him; he talked about his love of the painting of a pile of cherries by the 18th Century French painter, Chardin. The empty volume that is the shoe-carrying everyman in "Coat" reminds me of the short story "The Overcoat", by Nikolay Gogol, a writer he often spoke about. "Room", with its forms piled up, the perspective of the floor boards and the play of horizon line vs. picture plane, reminds me of the painting series, "The Battle of San Romano" by another of his heroes, the Italian Renaissance painter Ucello. Guston reveled in portraying the ordinariness of everyday things, how the stem attaches into a cherry, the pull hangs off a window shade and a button sits on a lapel.”

Guest curator artist Kristine Deninno has chosen a work from the Smithsonian Museum of American Art: “Distant Manhattan ...
04/23/2020

Guest curator artist Kristine Deninno has chosen a work from the Smithsonian Museum of American Art: “Distant Manhattan from Brooklyn (Distant New York)” by Louis Lozowick (Printer: George C. Miller) lithograph, 1937.

Kristine chose this work because “Hope is on my mind, all day, everyday. How to have more hope and how to send hope to others. I especially think of hope when thinking of New York City. We are all NYC, together alone and alone together, sending hope through artwork to each other.”

Tips for Collecting Prints, from a Printmaking Expert
04/21/2020
Tips for Collecting Prints, from a Printmaking Expert

Tips for Collecting Prints, from a Printmaking Expert

Miranda Metcalf, founder and host of “Pine | Copper | Lime” shares her professional advice and insights on how to develop and enjoy your own print collection.

Tamarind Institute
04/21/2020

Tamarind Institute

You don’t have to stop learning lithography even if you can’t access your shop or school.
Find our educational videos on Vimeo: Graining, etching, drawing materials, Chine-collé and blend roll all explained by our Educational Director, Brandon Gunn.

Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/319984879

Danielle O’Steen, curator at the Kreeger Museum shines the spotlight on two pastels from the Kreeger’s collection, each ...
04/21/2020

Danielle O’Steen, curator at the Kreeger Museum shines the spotlight on two pastels from the Kreeger’s collection, each with a detail: Marc Chagall, ‘Flowers—Still Life,’ c. 1955-57, gouache and pastel on paper, 26 3/8 x 19 5/8 inches.

Paul Gauguin, ‘Portrait of Clovis and Pola Gauguin,’ 1885, charcoal and pastel on paper, 27 3/4 x 20 1/2 inches.

Danielle says, “We have wonderful pastels in The Kreeger Museum’s collection, including these two works by Marc Chagall and Paul Gauguin. The charm of these drawings is in the details. Chagall fills his gouache and pastel drawing with a bouquet of yellow, blue, and white blossoms overflowing their vase, flanked by two of the Russian artist’s dreamlike figures floating in the top right corner. What is striking about this late work by Chagall is how he applies his materials. A detail shows that the artist first applied the soft pastel to the paper and then added sharp, squiggly lines of gouache on top, bringing texture and whimsy to the drawing. The Gauguin pastel similarly delights, starting with the hatched lines of cool colors the artist used to depict two of his children. The French artist made this drawing the same year he left his family, then living in Denmark, to return to Paris and pursue painting full time—an event perhaps anticipated in their distant gazes. A closer look at the work also reveals some of Gauguin’s process, as his guiding grid marks are still visible behind the face of the younger child, who endearingly clutches a sleeping kitten.”

Guest curator artist Julie Wolfe has chosen Agnes Denes’ “Map Projection - The Snail I, Study of Distortions: Isometric ...
04/20/2020

Guest curator artist Julie Wolfe has chosen Agnes Denes’ “Map Projection - The Snail I, Study of Distortions: Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space (series)” 1976, four-color lithograph @ngadc.

Julie says, “Agnes Denes is known as a pioneer of environmental art that emerged in the 1960's and also for a heady range of mediums to investigate science, philosophy, linguistics and psychology. I recently saw her comprehensive exhibition at The Shed in New York and was delighted to learn that a grouping of her exquisite drawings were in the permanent collection at The National Gallery of Art.

In Projections: The Snail, Denes projects an accurate geographical rendering of the globe onto an unexpected structure, in this case a snail, as means to re-imagine the earth and human existence. I chose this piece because of Denes' motives and ideas about self contained, self supporting systems of living, perhaps a dwelling for the future. All of this seems appropriate as our own world is upended and we are bound to face ourselves and to reconsider our existence and self contained home dwellings.”

When asked to spotlight a work on paper from her collection, GWU museums director and chief curator Lenore Miller chose ...
04/18/2020

When asked to spotlight a work on paper from her collection, GWU museums director and chief curator Lenore Miller chose Sam Gilliam’s “Yellow and Black,” 2001, serigraph. In her explanation, Miller said: “We are fortunate to have many works in the GW collection by Sam Gilliam. As a printmaker myself, I have always admired Sam Gilliam's innovative use of methods and materials that are parallel to his incredibly inventive work in other media.”

Lenore Miller, director and chief curator of the George Washington University art galleries has chosen from GW’s collect...
04/17/2020

Lenore Miller, director and chief curator of the George Washington University art galleries has chosen from GW’s collections Audrey Flack’s “Lady Madonna” 1972, lithograph.

When asked why she chose this work, Lenore said, “I have admired Audrey Flack’s work as a pioneering woman artist. And, this work was gifted by a kind friend and GW alumnus. There is an oil on canvas, “Macarena of Miracles,” Audrey Flack, 1971, owned by the Met. A comparison [with the Met’s painting] reveals a much simplified version in the print, featuring the head and some details of the costume. Both this print and the painting were inspired by the same venerated image of the Virgin in Seville, Spain.”

Address

Washington D.C., DC

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Washington Print Club posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby home improvement businesses


Comments

SPRING GREETINGS ~ HAPPY EASTER ~ HAPPY PASSOVER! ~~A Tribute to George Steiner Bookplate Competition Extension~~ “My father loved poetry and music. But deep in himself he thought teaching the finest thing aperson could do.” Victoria University ofWellington, New Zealand and the American Society of Bookplate Collectors & Designers (ASBC&D) introduced the George Steiner Bookplate Competition last year. First, our website went "down" for most of the year and since 2020 a series of unforseeable events have taken place. We have received written requests from several world printmakers for extensions on our competition deadline. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed everything for our Tribute to George Steiner Bookplate Competition. We now understand that many countries have understandably imposed "lockdown" restrictions to halt the spread of coronavirus. To address this issue, we must work to be flexible with ex libris artists. So we have extended the deadline to October 15th, 2020! I hope that artists are relieved and will participate in this important international competition and exhibition to honor this great man of letters. Now that everyone seems to have more creative time, design a superb ex libris for Tribute to George Steiner (1929-2020). You cannot lose! The entries are still coming in. The outcomes include: large cash prizes for the top Ex Libris prints. International exhibitions, articles, and a book" will come out in 2021. For the latest details and links, please visit our website:
Today, with Tim Doud and Chris With ( and Jack ) at American Universities' Katzen Museum of Art for discussion on the exhibition " Good Form, Decorum, and in the Manner" Portraits from the Collections of Washington Print Club Members. Excellent talk , wonderful work...so...show some good form and go see it.
The art of portrait painting is still alive and very well, you just need to know where to look...